Use software to keep watch on employees’ computers

Everything is okay while the employee productivity and output isn’t being affected, but once the output starts suffering, most organizations prefer using computer monitoring software to catch those employees.

Most organizations give complete Internet access to their employees, so that they can check their emails, etc. But, it is apparent that many employees take this leniency of their employer pretty lightly. Those employees often do several other tasks than checking emails.

There are only a few very specific conditions in which you’re allowed to monitor a computer someone else uses. For example, an employer may be allowed to monitor certain things, but only on hardware the company owns. A parent can track their child’s activity because they’re legally responsible for their children. However, outside this situations, there isn’t much wiggle room, and there probably shouldn’t be.

If you respect your employees’ dignity about their duties in the workplace, then you should use software to confirm if they give their 100 percent best effort and focus to the organization.

Finding out what someone else is doing isn’t as simple as saying “Computer! Watch them and report back to me!” You need to actually know what you’re looking for. If you’re a parent, you might want to give your child privacy, while making sure they’re not visiting seedier parts of the internet. If you’re an employer who needs to monitor an employee to watch for wrongdoing, you might want to log everything. Generally, monitoring falls into three categories:

  • Watch for certain activity. This is ideal when you generally don’t care what someone does using a device, as long as they follow the rules. For example, you may want to see when an employee uses Facebook, or a child views porn. Sometimes this can be accomplished with filtering, rather than surveillance, so try to consider all options.
  • Monitor all activity in certain apps. Employers may want to monitor certain apps, but don’t want to snoop on their Facebook. You might only care about what they do with company email, chat apps, or proprietary software. In that case, more selective monitoring may be better.
  • Monitor all activity in every app. In this case, you may want to see everything someone is doing. This might include monitoring a child’s chat logs if you’re worried they may be into something shady, or keeping tabs on an employee you think may be stealing from the company.